Wild in the garden

Our February meeting took place on one of the wildest nights of the winter – and what a great evening it was, too. Our speaker, Alan Price of Gatehouse Studio, came to talk to us about photographing the wildlife in our gardens. He has won and been shortlisted for many awards and showed us an amazing range of 100 images, all taken in his own garden. Inspirational, particularly as he pointed out that you don’t need a big garden to achieve amazing results.

And, since a picture paints a thousand words (but with a few hints and tips)…

blue-tits-in-snowdrops-gc

Blue tits in snowdrops. The snowdrops were placed on a bird table with crunched up peanuts at the base of the flowers – crunch the nuts up, and the birds will eat them in situ. For Alan, the key to success is a bird table like this, strategically dressed to tempt wildlife, using a hide (or even the house or shed as a hide), and having infinite reserves of patience. He repeatedly stressed the need to wait for things to happen, and here’s another example of what can result when you do:

bank-vole-and-blackberry-gc

Bank vole and blackberry. There are many voles and mice in Alan’s garden, and this shot was created by carefully placing the blackberries near an entrance hole, and waiting. So careful and considered observation is also a key – know your garden.

Sometimes a little careful help gets the shot.

slow-worm-gc

This beautiful slow worm (no, it’s not a snake; it’s a slow worm – a legless lizard, essentially) was found in the garden and carefully photographed in a glass bowl before being released.

This tiger moth was also carefully placed in the studio for photography, and then released. It was caught in a moth box put out on a summer evening, something Alan recommends. Moths are stunning – they’re not all ‘little brown jobs’. Not at all!

tiger-moth-gc

Fabulous!

A few more notes: Alan has a background in graphic design (you can tell), and stresses a few things relating to design when taking a photograph: the need to keep it simple, the need to plan – to have a preconceived idea of what you want – and the need for careful set dressing. On a more technical level, he uses a Nikon 7100 with a 300mm prime lens, and works at high speeds. He’ll use a central focus and crop afterwards, and – one last tip – says always focus on the eyes of your subject when photographing wildlife.

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4 thoughts on “Wild in the garden

  1. Thank you Kate for another splendid synopsis of the wonderful evening we had viewing Alan’s magical photographs. I guess my little box Brownie is sadly lacking in the equipment stakes so one day I will have to upgrade or learn to use Jimmy’s setup!!

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  2. HI Kate
    Enjoyed reading the blog( as always) even more so as I was unable to be there. Hope you don’t mind me using your excellent account, sadly without the wonderful pics, for the press report.
    Thanks in advance!
    Sue

    Like

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